What Do Passengers Really Want Out Of Their Flights?

    Lightweight seat fabrics

    According to a recent poll by travel review site TripAdvisor, 30 percent of people reported that the biggest improvement airlines could make would be comfortable seating. Notice that the phrase here is not ?more comfortable?, but genuinely comfortable ? and it?s no wonder why. With planes being consistently used for business travel, and quite frequently for leisure travel, the average person ends up spending a good portion of their lives on a plane. In fact, on average, 8 million people fly every day! So: what can be done to make airplane rides a bit more comfortable for passengers? The answers are surprisingly diverse.

    How Industrial Textile Solutions Can Improve Airplane Seating

    Who knew that upholstery seat fabrics could be so important to a comfortable plane ride? It?s reasonable to believe that airlines don?t. Yet something as simple as using nonwoven scrims on airplane seating could make a big difference in someone?s flight. Nonwoven scrims are a type of nonwoven fabric that have several advantages ? in part because these industrial textiles are comfortable rest against, and in part because they?re easy for commercial fabric manufacturers to make. By purchasing high quality nonwoven scrims, airlines can also know that they are opting for less flammable, longer-lasting fabrics. It?s an option that benefits both the airline and the client, with everyone ending up far more satisfied than they were before.

    More Leg Room: The Simplest Solution

    The fact is that everyone expects to be somewhat cramped when flying, with the current standard coach seat widths ranging from 17 to 19 inches between armrests. This is already potentially uncomfortable, particularly for men who tend to be larger than women. But add in the fact that airplane seating rarely has enough leg room, and you have a recipe for disaster. Many airline passengers feel that they are too closer to their neighbors for comfort, with 41% of airline passengers saying that greater leg room would be a huge improvement. Simply having more space to move around ? and stow carryon items ? would make so many people feel comfortable. This also takes into account the passengers who suffer from claustrophobia, allowing them to rest a bit easier during their flights.

    Know What Your Customers Want

    Though airlines cannot always control what kind of flight their passengers have, perhaps what?s most important is to respond to complaints. For example, Expedia reports that 21% of a year?s customers chose window seats over the 20% that chose aisle seats, suggesting that airline passengers value being able to see the view from above. Furthermore, things like complaints about the food available for overnight flights ? with some airlines still failing to provide vegan options ? and even flight attendant behavior deserve proper attention. These complaints may seem smile, but affecting them has a great effect on ticket sales. Remember: a happy customer is a loyal customer.